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10 reasons why young women’s literacy matters

Reading and writing can change a young woman’s life in more ways than you think…

1


Around the world,

76 million young women are illiterate, without the means to take control of, and transform their own lives – and the lives of their families.

2


A child born to a literate mother is

50% more likely to survive

beyond the age of 5.

3


Children born to a literate mother are more likely

to read and write too.

4


Literacy can transform

a young woman's economic situation. Reading and writing help women to learn new skills and find ways to earn more money, securing their financial independence.

5


People who can read and write are

more likely to vote

and therefore play a role in shaping their lives, their communities and society.

6


Learning to read and write means a young woman

can educate herself

on everything from child care and health issues to job opportunities.

7


The ability to read and write

increases self-confidence and improves job prospects.

8


Literacy helps people

lead healthier and longer lives,

by understanding basic ways to care for themselves - whether that's through learning about personal rights or reading medication descriptions.

9


If everyone could read and write, 171 million people could lift themselves

out of poverty.

10


Being able to read means a young woman can properly

learn about her rights

as a women and stand with other women to defend them.

Lancôme commits alongside the ngo CARE:
EUR 2 million to support CARE over five years.


As of 2017, a first literacy programme is being conducted in Morocco, followed by two other programmes starting 2018 in Guatemala and Thailand.

Morocco for
mothers’ education


PROJECT START: JULY 2017
PROJECT DURATION: FOUR YEARS
DIRECT BENEFICIARIES: 1,880 WOMEN
INDIRECT BENEFICIARIES: 13,000 PEOPLE

In Morocco, poverty and illiteracy affect a significant part of the population. Parents do not have the means to help their children with their schooling, leading to high school drop-out rates for the most vulnerable children. Providing mothers with access to education help them build self-confidence, get involved in their children's schooling, and impart the principles of equality and non-violence.

In practical terms, CARE is implementing pre-school and school education programmes in the marrakesh-Safi and greater Casablanca regions. 6,850 children and 2,280 parents are already the direct beneficiaries of these programmes. Today, thanks to the Write Her Future programme, an additional 1,100 women and 780 parents will be able

TO SUPPORT THEIR CHILDREN WITH THEIR SCHOOLING
AND TO ENTER INTO DIALOGUE WITH THE EDUCATIONAL
TEAMS SUPERVISING THEIR CHILDREN.

Guatemala
for women’s rights


PROJECT START: JANUARY 2018
PROJECT DURATION: FOUR YEARS
DIRECT BENEFICIARIES: 5,000 WOMEN
INDIRECT BENEFICIARIES: 25,000 PEOPLE

In Guatemala, where CARE has been operating for more than 30 years, inequality, exclusion and discrimination remain commonplace. Young women from aboriginal communities (which represent more than half of the population) have very few opportunities to
receive a formal education. As such, the literacy and functional literacy programme
targets them primarily.

LEARNING TO READ AND WRITE WILL ALLOW THEM
TO ACCESS INFORMATION, TO KNOW AND EXERCISE THEIR RIGHTS, TO ACTIVELY PARTICIPATE IN PUBLIC LIFE, AND TO CHANGE AND FOSTER PROGRESS IN SOCIETY.

In practical terms, the programme will be implemented in the El Quiché, Totonicapán, Sololá and Chimaltenango regions. It directly concerns 3,000 young aboriginal women excluded from the educational system, as well as 2,000 other women over 25 years old who have had no access to education and are mostly illiterate.

Thailand
for integration & independance


PROJECT START: JANUARY 2018
PROJECT DURATION: FOUR YEARS
DIRECT BENEFICIARIES: 1,200 WOMEN
INDIRECT BENEFICIARIES: 2,400 PEOPLE

The Nan province in Northern Thailand is home to several aboriginal communities, such as the Hmong and the Lua, each speaking their own language, which is very different to Thai. Young women from these communities are often forced to drop out of school to help provide for their families. Working in the fields, or sometimes in the city in low-qualification jobs, they have few opportunities for a career and independence. The aim is to help them learn to read and write Thai. Once they have mastered the language,

THEY CAN ACCESS BETTER JOBS, SPEAK OUT,
AND BE BETTER INTEGRATED IN THAI SOCIETY.

In practical terms, the programme is implemented in the Nan province, in centres that are also meeting places. This will enable the 1,000 women benefiting from literacy classes to learn while also sharing their knowledge. Ultimately, they will be able to teach other women what they have learned, thereby contributing to the literacy of about 2,400 other young women. A virtuous circle.

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