Visionnaire Crescendo

What are peels?

What are peels

We all want our skin to look youthful and feel healthy. The best way to achieve this is by using products that address your current skin issues and help reduce possible future problems. Enter the at-home skin peel. Designed to give you a more radiant complexion, face peels can help brighten the skin and reduce the appearance of visible fine lines, wrinkles, and pores.1, 2

How
Face Peels
Work

How face peels work

The first thing most people think of when they hear the words “skin peeling treatments” is chemical peels. These are usually performed by a dermatologist or esthetician. At-home skin peeling treatments work in a similar way to chemical peels, but provide a gentler experience.

A skin peel is a face exfoliator. It’s typically formulated with a combination of acids and other ingredients which exfoliate dead skin cells from skin’s surface.3 This process helps to reveal new skin cells, address clogged pores and manage any build-up on the surface of your skin, which may be caused by makeup, pollution, and other skincare products.4 The result is the appearance of a fresher, smoother-looking layer of surface skin.3, 4

Some Benefits of Skin Peeling Treatments

As mentioned above, face peels can be used to exfoliate the surface layer of your skin. They can address your current skincare concerns and can help reduce the chances of new ones from arising.1 – 5

  1. Can work like a brightening serum 6 – Because peels remove dead skin surface cells and increase skin surface cell turnover, skin can look and feel healthier and brighter. This is especially beneficial for anyone with dull, dry skin.
  2. Can help even out skin complexion 5 – 8 – Face peels provide gentle exfoliation which makes them an ideal face exfoliator for sensitive, oily, or dry skin. They help to even out the skin’s texture and improve the look of one’s complexion. Regular use of skin peeling treatments may increase the effectiveness of your skincare routine.
  3. Can help reduce the appearance of pores 5 – Dirt, excess oil, dead skin cells, makeup buildup, and environmental pollution can cause pores to become enlarged. Face peels can help remove this buildup, which in turn reduces pore visibility.
  4. Can help reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles 1, 2, 7, 9 – As our skin ages, surface cell turnover slows down. Skin peeling treatments help to increase surface cell turnover, which can reduce the appearance of imperfections and help your skin look visibly plumper with hydration.

Acids are the “It” Ingredient

Peels are generally formulated with acids and peeling agents to help exfoliate the surface level of skin. They can help even the look of your complexion, and smooth the appearance of the skin’s surface.9
Generally, at-home skin peeling treatments are formulated with a combination of lower strength alpha hydroxy acids(AHA) and beta hydroxy acids (BHA), as opposed to one acid at a higher strength.10 AHAs are typically gentler on the skin because they tend to be less drying. BHAs are the stronger of the two acids, which means they may dry out the skin.10 – 12 Face peels that are formulated with both types of acids may not only help improve visible results but also reduce the chances of skin irritation.11 – 12
The most common and effective acids used in peels include alpha hydroxy, glycolic, and salicylic.11, 12

Alpha Hydroxy Acids

Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHA)9, 12

AHA’s can be derived from lactic acid, found in milk, or fruit acid, found in oranges, lemons, or even apples. AHAs can also be found in over-the-counter skincare products.

They are generally used in product formulas to help provide chemical facial exfoliation. AHA’s work by “sloughing off” dead surface skin cells which can help reduce the chances of clogged pores and provide the appearance of a refreshed complexion.

By addressing dead surface skin cells through chemical exfoliation, AHA’s help to reduce the appearance of skin imperfections, such as visible fine lines and wrinkles, to reveal radiant-looking and visibly smoother skin.

Glycolic Acid13 – 15

Glycolic acid is a part of the Alpha Hydroxy Acid family. Derived from sugar cane, a peel containing glycolic acid can help create the appearance of smoother, more radiant skin.

Like other AHAs, glycolic acid is a face exfoliator. As it helps to improve the skin’s surface texture the skin can look and feel refreshed. This is great if you have visibly larger pores or acne prone skin.

Additionally, using peels may help to reduce the appearance of visible fine lines and wrinkles, as well as an uneven skin tone.

Salicylic Acid11, 16 – 18

If you’ve ever used an acne product you may be familiar with salicylic acid. It is one of the most commonly used beta-hydroxy acids (BHA). Salicylic acid is widely known for its ability to help aid in the natural removal of dead skin cells, which can slow due to aging, makeup buildup, sun damage, or clogged pores caused by excess oil production.

It’s also beneficial for aging skin and anyone who wants to address the visible signs of aging. A salicylic acid peel can help improve your skin’s appearance or texture so it looks softer and smoother.

Additionally, salicylic acid peels have been known to calm irritated skin, improve hydration, minimize the appearance of visible wrinkles, fine lines, and uneven skin tone.

New Skin Peel
Discovery
—Quinoa Husk
Extracts

Quinoa husk extracts

Quinoa isn’t just a popular super grain, it’s also been shown to have anti-aging benefits. Until recently, the quinoa husk was considered a waste product. However, researchers discovered that the husk contained saponins and polyphenols, which have exfoliating properties.

Researchers found that the combination of AHA’s and quinoa husks, helped to gently remove dead skin cells, revealing new surface skin cells, and improve the appearance of the skin’s texture.

Face peels offer many benefits for anyone looking to reduce the appearance of visible pores and fine lines and wrinkles, while also revealing brighter-looking skin. No matter which type of face peel you use, it is important to maintain a post-peel routine. Follow-up your skin peeling treatment with a serum, moisturizer, and don’t forget to always apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher every day.

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Expand to see references.

References:

  1. Chemical peels overview. American Academy of Dermatology Website. https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/cosmetic-treatments/chemical-peels.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  2. Why it’s done. Tests and procedure chemical peel page. Mayo Clinic Website. http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/chemical-peel/basics/why-its-done/prc-20023436,
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  3. Evaluate before you exfoliate. American Academy of Dermatology Website. https://www.aad.org/media/news-releases/evaluate-before-you-exfoliate.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  4. Definition. Tests and procedure chemical peel page. Mayo Clinic Website. http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/chemical-peel/basics/definition/prc-20023436,
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  5. The appeal of chemical peels: Considerations for skin of color. American Academy of Dermatology Website. https://www.aad.org/media/news-releases/the-appeal-of-chemical-peels-considerations-for-skin-of-color.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  6. Benefits of chemical peels. Harvard Health Publications. Harvard Medical School website. www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/when-to-get-a-skin-peel.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  7. Benefits of chemical peels. DermaNetwork Website. http://www.dermanetwork.org/article/cosmetic-enhancements/benefits-of-chemical-peels.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  8. Cosmetic and health benefits of a chemical peel. DermaNetwork website. http://www.dermanetwork.org/article/cosmetic-enhancements/cosmetic-and-health-benefits-of-a-chemical-peel.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  9. Aging skin and skin care products. American Academy of Dermatology Website. https://www.aad.org/media/stats/cosmetic-treatments.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  10. How to safely exfoliate at home. American Academy of Dermatology Website. https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  11. Beta hydroxy acids. U.S. Food & Drug Administration Website. https://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/productsingredients/ingredients/ucm107943.htm.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  12. Alpha hydroxy acids. U.S. Food & Drug Administration Website. https://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/ProductsIngredients/Ingredients/ucm107940.htm.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  13. What is glycolic acid and what are the skin care benefits of glycolic acid. Loreal Paris USA website. https://www.lorealparisusa.com/beauty-magazine/skin-care/skin-care-concerns/what-is-glycolic-acid-and-what-are-the-skin-care-benefits-of-glycolic-acid.aspx
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  14. Murad H, Shamban AT, Premo PS. The use of glycolic acid as a peeling agent. Dermatol Clin. 1995 Apr;13(2)285-307. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7600706)
  15. Katz BE, Joseph L, McHugh L, et al. The tolerability and efficacy of a three-product anti-aging treatment regimen in subjects with moderate-to-severe photodamage. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2015 Oct;8(10): 21-26. (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4633208)
  16. Salicylic acid. Pubchem website. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/338.
    Accessed April 13, 2017.
  17. Hartmann AA, The influences of various factors on the human resident skin flora. Semin Dermatol 9 (4), 305-308. 12 1990. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2285575)
  18. Tasleem A, Salicylic acid as a peeling agent: a comprehensive review. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2015;8: 455-461.
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